English Place-name Society

Survey of English Place-Names

A county-by-county guide to the linguistic origins of England’s place-names – a project of the English Place-Name Society, founded 1923.

Walleybourne

Early-attested site in the Parish of Church Pulverbatch

Historical Forms

  • Walibourne c.1216-30 SBL6903 1338-9 ForProc 1346 FA
  • Waliburn' 1272 Cl
  • Walyburn 1417 Fine
  • Walyburne 1431 FA
  • Walyborne 1528 SBL4001
  • Walyngborne 1327 SAS2/X 1364-6 ForProc
  • Walyngbourne 1342 Cl 1594 SBL6794
  • Walyngborn 1438 Fine
  • Walynbourne 1346 FA
  • Walynborne 1364-6 ForProc
  • Walliborne 1577 Saxton 1602 SBL13450
  • Wallibourne 1602 SBL7075
  • Wallyburne 1602 SBL6907
  • Walliborn 1694 SBL9955
  • Wallybourn 1712 PR(L)
  • Wallingbourne 1594 SBL6794
  • Walliborne alias Wallingbourne 1605 SBL6909
  • Wallingebourne 1610 SBL7057
  • Wallingborow 1631 PR(L)
  • Wallaburne 1604 SBL7067
  • Wallesbourn 1807 PR(L)

Etymology

The forms suggest OE  *Walingburna , which could be explained as 'stream associated with Walh ('Welshman')', v. burna , -ing-. Compounds of burna with personal names are rather rare, however. Walburn PN NRY 270 is 'stream of the Welshmen', but the Walleybourne forms require a connective -ing -, and this is most appropriate with a personal name.

It is probably only a coincidence that an estate here was granted to John Walensis in the early 13th cent. (SBL 6903 ). An -ing- formation would not be coined at that date, and in any case the place-name was in existence at the date of the grant. An earlier owner named Walh seems the likeliest explanation.