English Place-name Society

Survey of English Place-Names

A county-by-county guide to the linguistic origins of England’s place-names – a project of the English Place-Name Society, founded 1923.

Longnor

Parish in the County of Shropshire

Historical Forms

  • Longenorlegh' 1291-2 Ass
  • Longnorley 1586 SBL6699
  • Langanara 1121 SAC
  • Langanarra 1155 SAC
  • Longenalra 1155 SAC
  • Longenalre e.13th,c.1233 HAC
  • Longenalr', Longenolre 1261-2 ForProc
  • Longenolre 1271-2 Ass 1338 Pat
  • Longenolr 1334 SR
  • Longenholre 1322 Pat
  • Longnolre 1431 FA
  • Longelorn' 1242 Fees
  • Longenour' (p), Longenore 1255-6 Ass
  • Longnore 1569 SBL6621
  • Longnor 1587 PR(L)
  • Langenolre 1291-2 Ass
  • Longner 1672 HTR 1675 PR(L)
  • Logner 1675 Ogilby
  • Longenorlegh' 1291-2 Ass
  • Longnorley 1586 SBL6699

Etymology

See the discussion of Longner above. Some early-13th-cent. bounds of woodland in Longnor (HAC p.144) mention a thick alder (“ad grossam alnum”), but this probably only an indication of the persistence of alders in the parish, not an indication that Longnor is named from a single tree.

A DB estate called Lege is considered to be Longnor (see discussion of Leebotwood above). Longenorlegh '1291-2Ass and Longnorley 1586SBL 6699 may preserve the DB name, with Longnor as prefix.