English Place-name Society

Survey of English Place-Names

A county-by-county guide to the linguistic origins of England’s place-names – a project of the English Place-Name Society, founded 1923.

Cockshutt

Parish in the County of Shropshire

Historical Forms

  • La Cockesete 1270 AD
  • Kackeshute 1427 SBL4028
  • Cokshote 1549 Pat
  • Cockshutt(e) 1557 SAS4/X
  • Cockshot 1577 Saxton
  • Cockshutt 1588 SBL3648
  • Cocshut 1644 PR(L)
  • Cockshut 1688 PR(L)
  • Cockshute 1772 PRCockshutt

Etymology

A cockshoot is a woodland glade where nets were stretched to catch woodcock. The word is fairly common as a minor place-name (v. *cocc-scīete), but this Shropshire instance is probably the only one which has become a parish-name. An ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1872 from Ellesmere parish, and this became a civil parish in 1896. Saxton's map of 1577 marks 'Cockshot Chap.', and this chapel may have provided a focal point for a small settlement.

The identification of the c.1270 reference is not certain. AD (I, p.323 catalogues the deed with a marginal attribution to Shropshire. It is a grant of two messuages and land in La Cockesete by Stephen Dorelot to Hugh le Vavassur. There are other places with this name in Shropshire, but Cockshutt in Ellesmere is the most likely to have contained messuages c.1270.

The area contains five townships: Cockshutt and Crosemere; Frankton; Kenwick Park; Kenwick, Stockett and Whettall; Kenwick's Wood. Each of these has its own TA survey as a township of Ellesmere.The place-name material has been arranged within these divisions according to George Foxall's TAMaps .

Major Settlements